Tracer 700 Tieferlegung

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  • Hallo zusammen,


    hat schon einer von euch die Tracer 700 tiefer gelegt? Würde die Tracer gerne für meine Frau 40 mm tiefer legen. Wie lange dauert das und was kostet es ? Danke schon vorab für die Infos!!!


    Gruß


    Dirk :winken

  • Die sinnvollste (aber nicht günstigste) Art ist ein Tieferlegungskit von Wilbers zu kaufen. Beinhaltet kürzere Gabelfedern und ein komplettes Federbein.
    Offiziell wird die Maschine dadurch nur 20mm tiefer. Wenn du aber hinten die Federvorspannung lockerst kommst du ganz locker auf deine gewünschten 40mm.

    MT 07 Race Blue ABS Sonderlackierung, RI-Thunder Carbon, Wilbers Federbein -20mm, progressive Gabelfedern Wirth, SW-Sturzpads Motor, GSG-Sturzpads an Achsen, Craze-Kühlergrillabdeckung, Hauptständer, Topcaseträger SW-MoTech, Ermax-Scheibe, Oxford-Touring Heizgriffe, Held Tankrucksack

  • Mit zu geringer Federvospannung zu fahren ist aber auch nicht das gelbe vom Ei.
    Es gibt Schuster die Motorradstiefel höher legen.

    Was mehr als 215kg (ohne Koffer) wiegt, wäre besser ein Auto geworden.

  • Mit zu geringer Federvospannung zu fahren ist aber auch nicht das gelbe vom Ei.


    meine MT ist auf die Art und Weise um 35mm runter hinten. Gegenüber Originalfahrwerk habe ich viel höhere Sicherheitsreserven. Kann, ganz besonders auf schlechten Straßen deutlich schneller fahren als vorher ohne (Zubehör-)Fahrwerk dass sie nervös wird und anfängt zu stempeln.
    Ist auch Schwachsinn, ändert ja nichts an der Dämpfung

    MT 07 Race Blue ABS Sonderlackierung, RI-Thunder Carbon, Wilbers Federbein -20mm, progressive Gabelfedern Wirth, SW-Sturzpads Motor, GSG-Sturzpads an Achsen, Craze-Kühlergrillabdeckung, Hauptständer, Topcaseträger SW-MoTech, Ermax-Scheibe, Oxford-Touring Heizgriffe, Held Tankrucksack

  • I am not sure this topic should be in "General Topics" forum, but I will still use it instead of opening another one in "Umbauten".


    I have to lower my future Tracer 700 (or any other bike) to the seat height of at most 810mm. 800mm would be perfect.
    Stock Tracer 700 seat should be at 835mm.


    Contrary to Tracer 900, Yamaha unfortunately does not provide a low seat replacement bench. I guess modification of the seat itself would introduce the least change to chassis position and handling, but on the other hand it would be probably impossible to shave off more than 10 to 15mm. So, I have examined other options.


    Option #1:


    As already mentioned in these forums (and this topic), Wilbers suspension modification could lower the bike 20 to 40mm. On Wilbers' site shock absorber can be selected with the original height, 20 and 40mm lowering effect. On the same site one can choose springs for the original height or with 20mm lowering. I am not sure if those shock and spring values should match or they should be "added" to each other.

    Anyways, this option is a bit pricey, but it should also bring better handling than with the stock suspension, as I understood.


    Option #2:


    I saw Hyperpro replacement springs (front and rear) lowering Tracer for 25mm. This suspension modification option is less expensive than Wilbers' one, but I do not know how it compares performance-wise to Wilbers nor stock.


    Option #3:


    A long time ago, on couple of forums I have run into very positively rated Lust Racing products:
    http://www.lustracing.co.uk/su…er-700-lowering-kits.html
    They are lowering Tracer 700 by 25mm by spring retainer (2016-2018) and 30mm by pivot-arm (2019).

    Spring retainer is a cheaper option, but one needs spring clamps to mount it. It reduces spring preload and thus softens suspension.
    Pivot arm is a better solution for heavy load, pillion and / or luggage, but it fits only on the 2019 model.
    As both options lower the bike only on the rear side, the manufacturer suggests dropping forks in the triple-clamp a bit, too.


    Option #4:


    Willbers also have linkage replacement parts lowering Tracer 700 by
    25mm:
    https://www.wilbers-shop.de/en…M15/Promoto-Lowering-Kit- 25-mm.html? Year = 2018
    40mm:
    https://www.wilbers-shop.de/en…o-Lowering-Kit-40-mm.html ? year = 2018
    60mm:
    https://www.wilbers-shop.de/en…-Kit-60-mm.html?year=2018
    No precise description is avalable, but if those are regular dog-bones links shown in photo, they are really similar to ones Yamaha provides for Tracer 900 (15mm lowering).


    Option #5:


    Metisse has a couple of interesting products for Tracer 700, too.
    25mm:
    https://www.metisse.de/technik…er-yamaha-tracer-700.html
    40mm:
    https://www.metisse.de/technik…e-yamaha-tracer-1315.html
    60mm:
    https://www.metisse.de/technik…e-yamaha-tracer-1316.html
    Manufacturer suggests dropping forks a bit, as expected.

    60mm option is limited to single person riding, so I suppose Wilbers 60mm linkage modification carries the same restriction, although it's not noted on their web site.

    I guess it's very important that the company officially states each of those parts have TÜV / ABE certificates.


    Option #6 :


    Last but not least, I have found a real overkill option with integrated selection of +25mm, stock, -25mm and -35mm height positions:

    https://www.extremecreations.com.au/mt-07-jack-up-plates
    With shipping it should be ~ AUD 230-280 (depending on bearings & seals), so roughly 135-165 euro.


    So, I need 25 to 35mm lowering, as I have measured so far. Maybe 25mm would be enough, but I'm still not sure.
    In most cases, the next step after 25mm is 40mm. I would definitely feel comfortable standing with that kind of modification, but I do not know how much this amount of lowering will affect handling.
    I guess TÜV / ABE certified parts are the safest bet, but I am not really familiar with these regulations, so please correct me if I'm wrong.


    Which are your opinions, thoughts and advices about this whole topic?


    BTW, count on the fact that in most cases side stand has to be shortened. I did not find any comment about 3rd party center stands.

  • So, any thoughts about this?

    Is there any of these lowering techniques which should be strictly avoided?

    There´s nothing which should be avoided, I think.

    Accorduing to your Post, I would prefer option 3 or 5, which ever is more convenient to you.

    Everything in regard to the guidlines of your county!


    Godspeed


    Chris

  • Thx a lot for the suggestion.

    As I live in Vienna/Austria, I guess option #5 will bring me useful TÜV / ABE certificate, although option #3 parts look more fancy. :)


    Now it's time to get measurement done correctly.


    I got my bike couple of days ago ( New member of the club ), and rode couple of hundreds km both in the city and on country roads. Riding seems very nice and I mostly have no issue with the seat height, even when stopping on traffic lights. I can tip-toe both legs like some ballerina, or I can move to one side of the seat and reach ground with my full foot, including the hill.

    Nevertheless, as soon as I have to maneuver around or just park going backwards, I start loosing grip and cannot move bike reliably. It's both funny to see and dangerous for the bike to be, as if I slip my toes too hard, I could drop the bike easily. I would really not like to do it. :)


    So, if I go for option #3, I have to examine 25 and 40mm options. My original stance on the bike is like this:


    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    That's what I'm talking about: I can manage it, start, stop, but it's not comfortable for a city commuting, maneuvering, parking. No grip.


    And so, I got couple of pieces of wood to simulate lower bike / higher ground. Following photos are made with wooden blocks 23mm thick, representing 25mm lowering setting:


    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    With ~40mm I miss just a bit to put both heels down simultaneously. I guess I do not need to go that low (40mm), and that it would be better to keep a bit of distance between the exhaust and the ground.


    How does this 25mm "lowering" looks for you?

    Does this kind of foot grip look normal / reliable or should I still go for the full 40mm dive?

  • I see!


    25mm would be the best in concern to suspension.

    40mm the best according to your legs.

    I would lower by 25 to 30 mm max.

    There´s a chance to obtain most of the pitch.

    Additionally you can stick the front fork through by ~ 20 mm.

    So the bike lowers overall!


    In the end it´s a kind of concession.

    You must feel safe by holding the bike.;)


    (Hopefully understandable! My English is rusty meanwhile...)

  • One more measurement and slowly, slowly, I have to make a decision...


    24mm thick wooden blocks representing 25mm lowering:

    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    28mm thick wooden blocks representing 30mm lowering:

    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    38mm thick wooden blocks representing 40mm lowering:

    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    My hill obviously goes closer and closer the the "ground", but how close it really should be?

    Is it really beneficial to have both heels on the ground at the same time, or that is only valid for choppers?


    Also, if I would get 30mm lowering kit from England, how hard it would be to register it or make it legal after mounting in Austria?


    Comparison of Metisse part (40mm):

    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    and Lust Racing part (30mm):

    Bitte melde dich an, um diesen Anhang zu sehen.


    It seems that Lust Racing part has its own integrated bearings, too.

  • Hi, try following thing, with different wooden blocks:


    Lean the motorcycle to one side until your foot is completely on the ground.


    If the motorcycle is still fairly upright and almost no force is required to make it fall over, it fits.


    Try that with a passenger or the weight of luggage.


    Because of what you write, you don't sound like an experienced driver.


    Think, you will also have to stop on a slope, when turning, in country lanes, for example.

    With uneven surface.


    So it should be relatively safe with one foot because sometimes you can't use two feet.

    Call me the Breeze...I keep blowing down the road (J. J. Cale)

  • Hi Trxman,


    I have an "old" Tracer 700 with lower suspension. I asked the original Yamaha solution and have it since the very beginning, 0 Km. I believe, so the seat height is exactly (or very close to) the MT07.

    As written above, try it also in your boots, could mean a lot. even if you have a middle standard, would restrict your options. I have only a side standard but still, I should be vey carefull in narrow curves, because it touches the road.

    I`m really satisfied with this solution, but had to learn how the bike working with this conditions.


    Cheers

    Andras

  • Thx everybody for the involvement!


    @Breeze I can get the bike stable with my whole foot down (hill down) even now, but I have to shift my bottom pretty far away aside from the center of the seat. I do understand I will not always be in ideal conditions, on flat surfaces, roads without a slope. That's why I guess I will go for the maximum lowering (40mm), as even in this case I am not flat on the ground with both feet (last violet snickers photo from my previous post).


    @ndrs! Although 90% of my riding is in the city (commuting to the office and back), I'll definitely test my bike boots too.


    @andrasbandi I have never heard of Yamaha's original lowering option for Tracer 700 before model 2020. Model 2020 has an optional low seat shaving off some 20mm of the seat height. Having the seat height close to MT-07 would be ideal for me, but that requires ~30mm of lowering. Could you please try getting some more info about the modification that was made to your bike?


    Regarding the limitation factor of reduced lean angle: I am aware of the fact that there will be trade-offs. :(

    I just have to focus on the feature I need more often, and that's static stability.

    Ideally, I would have two bikes - one low and stable for the city and one tall to cut the curves during the tours... Maybe in some other lifetime.

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