Regular maintenance done personally

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  • Hello.


    As I was maintaining my previous bike on my own, I would like to do as much as possible on Tracer, too.

    So, I have a couple of questions regarding regular maintenance.


    1. If you invest time and effort to reach and take out spark plugs @10.000 km, do you clean and re-gap them or you just put two new ones (although they should be changed @20.000 km)?


    2. Checking and adjusting synchronization of fuel injection - Would some tool like this one:

    https://www.louis.eu/artikel/c…iser-0-to-1-bar_/10002587

    be suficient to make this action?

    Also, in manual it's stated synchronization should be checked both annually and at specific mileage. Do you really do this that often?


    3. For "Diagnostic system check" Yamaha diagnostic tool is needed. Can original or some copy with similar functionalities be acquired?


    4. Do you change oil filter every oil change or each second?



    My Tracer had just 2 services so far:


    Service at 1000 km, August 2017, bill lists following: checking, oil (Motul 5100 10W40) and oil filter (HiFLO) change

    Service at 6700 km, July 2019, bill lists following: checking, oil cleaner, oil (Yamalube S 4 10W40) change, fuel system cleaner


    I bought it with 7800 km and now it's about 8300 km.

    So, my Yamalube has covered ~1600 km, but soon it will be one year old. Should I hurry up with the oil change, or should I leave it at least until it covers some thousands of kilometres?


    BTW, do you prefer Yamalube oil or any good quality oil like Motul 5100 should be fine?

    Tracer's manual specifies semi-synthetic or synthetic oils and both Motul 5100 and 7100 have quite similar price. Is there any benefit of riding full synthetics in CP2 or not?

    Do you always stick to 10W40, or there are scenarios for 5W40, 10W50, 10W60 and so on...?


    :denk

  • 10W40 is right. I would take 10W50 only if i would make a Journey down south, for example southern spain, where the temperature can rise up to 40 degrees.

    Call me the Breeze...I keep blowing down the road (J. J. Cale)

  • OK, got it. Thx.


    Lubrication points: I understand that pilot shafts for brake and clutch levers should be put out and lubricated, but how do you lubricate pivot points of gear shift and brake pedal? Do they also have to be taken apart or grease should be applied from outside?


    BTW, for most of the parts lithium-soap based grease should be used. I got Liqui Moly Multi-purpose grease 3552

    https://products.liqui-moly.com/multipurpose-grease-2.html

    for this purpose.

    Why brake lever should be lubed with silicon grease instead? Why is lithium-soap grease not suitable for the brake lever?


    Which lubricant to use for throttle grip housing?

  • Silicon grease is better for high pressures at bolts. It is like a glue. The pressures, when you brake harder, is higher then you would believe.


    And if some of the grease comes to the rubber of the brake piston system, nearby the bold, it is not harmfull for it.


    Other greases destroy the rubber.


    That is why Silicon grease is also used for the rubber of the brake piston seal down at the disc.


    I have 80.000 km on my MT and never openend the housing🤣

    I would only spray a little bit Ballistol. But you can take every lighter Grease, for example Lithium.

    Call me the Breeze...I keep blowing down the road (J. J. Cale)

    Einmal editiert, zuletzt von Breeze ()

  • I have 80.000 km on my MT and never openend the housing🤣

    I would only spray a little bit Ballistol. But you can take every lighter Grease, for example Lithium.

    So, you never lubed throttle cables for 80.000 km ?! Great! I will follow. :)

    Where exactly do you spray Ballistol? Through the ventilation hole?

  • Next question:

    Is the original oil drain plug magnetic one, or should I buy the third party bolt before the oil change?

  • Whatever you do, never buy a third party bolt with a shorter thread and tighten it with the torque Yamaha recommends. Good chance to strip your oil pan thread ;)

    You may use your original bolt again with a new washer.

    Wenns vorne rasselt und hinten stinkt isse in Ordnung...

  • Whatever you do, never buy a third party bolt with a shorter thread and tighten it with the torque Yamaha recommends. Good chance to strip your oil pan thread ;)

    You may use your original bolt again with a new washer.

    I'll definitely pay attention on that.

    I thought to get magnetic one to collect iron / steel parts shredded from the engine. I got a little bit of them on my Freewind every oil change.

    Then again, I guess a lot of shredded parts on CP2 will be aluminum, so no magnet will help here. Long live the oil filter!

  • You have so many Questions.


    What have we done 30 Years before:denkwithout Internet?


    You don't need such a bolt, because i never needed it in 875.000 km on any bike.

    Call me the Breeze...I keep blowing down the road (J. J. Cale)

  • Same to point 4.: oil change = filter change!

    Is there any reason to chase original Yamaha filter or one can use something like:

    HifloFiltro HF204 Ölfilter Anzahl 1 (Affiliate-Link)

    HifloFiltro HF204RC Ölfilter Anzahl 1 (Affiliate-Link)

    https://www.amazon.de/dp/B008S6GEB2 (Affiliate-Link)


    Which filter people here usually prefer?

  • I had the K&N, I had the HF204RC... no problem, no difference to me

    So HF204RC is worth it compared to regular HF204, or you have been choosing K&N and HF204RC just because torquing with regular 17mm socket ?

  • Yes, I am lazy and like to use my new torque wrench, thats why I choose the ones with the 17 mm hex dingsbumms :)
    And it is a little bit of additional metal in the area where the stones fly, don't know if this is a point. Anyway, I have never heard of real problems with any kind of oil filter.

    Wenns vorne rasselt und hinten stinkt isse in Ordnung...

  • Well, 5W40 should be a bit thinner when it's cold, during the engine start, and be the same viscosity as 10W40 when engine warms up.

    This should only be beneficial for engine, as long as the oil does not degrade a lot quicker then regular 10W40.

  • Well, this previous comment of mine was more about these facts:

    • first number represents viscosity when oil is cold
    • second number represents viscosity when oil is close to the working temperature
    • as both 5W40 and 10W40 have the same viscosity index for the working temperature, they should be practically equal once the engine reaches operating temperature, no meter if outside is -10 or +20 degrees Celsius; thermostat jumps in as needed and keeps the engine warm, so no differences at that point
    • the only difference between those two oil types can be seen before engine reaches the running temp, until engine is cold; in that time period, 5W40 should be lighter, more fluid and provide easier movement through the lubrication system, thus providing better lubrication earlier
    • I guess whole story could be ignored by people starting their bikes just twice a day to run long tours, as those bikes run warmed up 99% of the time; on the other hand, if bike is used to commute, visit many different places during the day, many times it starts its engine is already cold and has to go through warm up procedure; theoretically, 5W40 could help in this case - nowhere else
  • Oh mate, a lot of words, i am a commuter. 15.000 - 20.000 a year.


    Starting at 3 degrees in the morning, go shoppinc etc., you don't need a 5W40.


    The wider the temperature range of the oil, the faster it loses its ability to cover it.

    Call me the Breeze...I keep blowing down the road (J. J. Cale)

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